Kirsty Burgoine: A question of deliverables and other such stuff

Orde Saunders' avatarPublished: by Orde Saunders

Kirsty Burgoine was speaking about responsive process at Responsive Day Out, these are my notes from her talk.

I don't give people the option to not have responsive.

Trust doesn't come naturally, this is what you client feels befoe they work with you.  Deliverables are the touch stones for this.

Now we no longer work pixel perfect to comps it's harder to do have those deliverables.

The only way I could keep up with new technologies was to apply it to client work.  Everything would be responsive.

Approach 1

Tell clients nothing about responsive and just deliver it. 

* Advantages: Clients were happy, didn't need to change my workflow.    * Disadvantages: No planning for mobile -> steep learning curve.  Additional time and costs.

Approach 2

Promise nothing.  No commitment to what it would look like.

* Advantages: Clients were happy, didn't need to change workflow, could increase timescales and costs.   * Disadvantage: Client had no idea what the mobile version was going to look like or how it would work.

Approach 3

Straight to the code.  Throw out workflow, build and discuss concurrently - allow design to grow organically.

  • Advantages: Able to get the data in very early on
  • Disadvantage:  No deliverables so the client didn't trust what I was doing.  Lots of small changes start to add up.  Feedback from hell.

Now

There is no one solution that fits every client.  Don't be afraid of doing something different.  Do all the things when they need doing - the important thing is to communicate ideas at all stages.

Trust between you and the client is now more important than ever. It needs to be nurtured.

Plan and budget properly - suprises are never a good idea.  If you work through the night: bill.

Set expectaions for all aspects from the beginning.

Don't leave the client to their own devices - they will form their own oppinions.

Show the client